Learning almost anything and the magic dance

A Creative Life, art exhibit, art gallery, art techniques, business of art, fine art, mental health, Odditerrarium, Sustainable creativity

Dancing smoothly nowadays as I near time to deliver all 20 of my Odditerrarium artworks for exhibit via Caplan Art Designs which opens in June at Burnt Bridge Cellars.

All 20 artworks are finished. In progress is the framing, the exhibit paperwork, the delivery and the social media about it all. An artist’s work is never done…it’s a lot like a cooks work that way.

But here’s one of my paintings titled “Learning Almost Anything”. Like the others in my Odditerrarium series it is 10 x 8 inches, created with ink, gouache and collage on board.

Here’s a closer view so you can see what this dog is thinking.

Doing fine art exhibits, like writing for publication, requires both being organized and resisting tempting parking spots. I have two phrases thumbtacked to my studio wall to help me remember.

When I began my Odditerrarium painting series in 2021 I did enough planning in my sketchbook that I knew the sizes I wanted to work in. I created 5 or so of the paintings to see if my series idea had legs. Then over a month ago I ordered frames from the Aurora Gallery. The frames are made by hand and that takes time.  The first box of frames is in my studio ready for action. A second box of frames is due soon.

Now that creation of the paintings is done I set up a system, a working routine, so that I don’t wear out my hand doing the varnishing or framing processes.

Elsewhere in my blog I’ve talked about working in short bursts as a way to make time, energy and the financial components of a creative life sustainable. This is true too of the varnish and frame stage.

More than a month ago I also ordered the cans of varnish I knew I’d need along with a few other art supplies from my local Artist and Craftsman. My dachshund supervisor made sure the order was correct when it came.

Now my daily routine includes a “spray two frame two” dance. It goes like this: just before lunch I take two paintings to my garage where I spray a coat of varnish. Then we have lunch. After lunch I spray another coat of varnish on those same two paintings. Here’s a photo of me in the respirator mask I use when I spray varnish.

Those just varnished paintings stay out in the garage the rest of the day. When I quit working for the day, around dinner time, I bring them into the studio and put them on the easel to finish drying. In the photo below you see two just-varnished paintings on my easel. To the right of the easel is a framing station. My painting supplies are still out because there are other projects in progress just to the left of this photo. There are other creative projects that get a short burst of work each day so that’s another reason why the just-varnished stay out in the garage till the day is done.

Here are two getting framed. Having the varnished art on the easel puts them within easy reach of my frame station. Doing the varnishing around lunchtime the previous day means that by the time they get put into frames 24 or so hours have passed and the varnish is completely dry.

Besides checking in the new art supplies my dachshund supervisor also oversees the framing. He’s very busy, perhaps more busy than usual lately, but like I do, he paces himself so that it’s sustainable.

Like the quote thumbtacked just above the light switch in the photo below says about dancing and magic happening, being organized doesn’t guarentee smoothly run projects. (Another mantra I use often: “Nothing has to go right today”) Organization gives my projects a sporting chance to be sustainable, it gives me the possibility of meeting deadlines with a smile. Besides I deeply despise chaos and rushing about so I prefer to pace myself (and dance) at a calm speed.

And I treasure time each day to read and learn almost anything.

I hope your week goes at your preferred pace. Take care of yourself. See you next Monday.

chihuahua book hat

A Creative Life, animals in art, books, fine art, handmade papers, visual story

Here is number 3, in my new series of related artworks, titled “The Read Hat”.  For this one I focused on memory and awareness; the image of a book symbolizes a collection of information, the ancient Greek text represents the beginnings of human philosophical thought… and yes, I also thought of magicians and the hat as a (voila!) vehicle for transformation.

Like the other two artworks “The Read Hat” was also inspired by colors in my landscape, Chihuahua dogs, dot patterns and comfortable pajamas.

The Read Hat by Sue Clancy, 14 x 11 x 2 inches, hand dyed paper, hand stenciled paper, handmade paper, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.

The Read Hat by Sue Clancy, 14 x 11 x 2 inches, hand dyed paper, hand stenciled paper, handmade paper, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.

Posts about the other 2 artworks in this series of 3 are here: https://sueclancy.com/2016/04/04/chihuahua-book-balloon/ and here: https://sueclancy.com/2016/04/07/chihuahua-book-wagon/

chihuahua book wagon

A Creative Life, animals in art, books, fine art, handmade papers, visual story

Like the first piece in my new series of 3 artworks, my second piece has also been inspired by dots, evening book reading, chihuahua’s and the colors I’ve seen in my local landscape. My newest piece is titled “The Read Wagon”. It, too, is made with my hand dyed, handmade papers, hand stenciled papers, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.

For “The Read Wagon” I thought about how books I’ve read in the past, the experiences I’ve had, have enabled me to understand and appreciate new-to-me books and new-to-me experiences. I imagine myself as walking around with an invisible wagon tagging along behind me full of the stuff-of-memory, education and awareness.

The Read Wagon by Sue Clancy, 14 x 11 x 2 inches, hand dyed paper, hand stenciled paper, handmade paper, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.

The Read Wagon by Sue Clancy, 14 x 11 x 2 inches, hand dyed paper, hand stenciled paper, handmade paper, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.

The post, about “The Read Balloon”, my first piece in this series is located here: http://sueclancy.com/2016/04/04/chihuahua-book-balloon/

chihuahua book balloon

A Creative Life, animals in art, books, fine art, handmade papers, visual story

I’ve been thinking of dot patterns, dogs, books and how I enjoy wearing my pajamas and reading before bed in the evening. I’ve been thinking of how books sometimes seem to  appear in our lives as if dropped from the sky – and how we release them back when we’re done reading them. Oh, and language ‘balloons’ or ‘thought bubbles’…

Also, recently I’ve been taking walks on the Salmon Creek Trail in Vancouver WA, noting the colors of the sky, the water, the landscape – and getting to see and meet many dogs along the way. Lots of Chihuahua’s! All of this (and more) has inspired a series of 3 artworks – the first of which is “The Read Balloon”.  Stay tuned for the others…

"The Read Balloon" by Sue Clancy, 14 x 11 x 2 inches, hand dyed paper, hand stenciled paper, handmade paper, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.

“The Read Balloon” by Sue Clancy, 14 x 11 x 2 inches, hand dyed paper, hand stenciled paper, handmade paper, found paper and acrylic on cradled board.